• Flood Advisory for Epworth - Click for Details
    Expires: February 28, 2021 @ 8:15am
    PRECAUTIONARY
    Turn around, don't drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles. Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize the dangers of flooding.
    LOCATION
    Urban and Small Stream Flood Advisory for... Hamilton County in south central Illinois... White County in southeastern Illinois... Posey County in southwestern Indiana... Spencer County in southwestern Indiana... Vanderburgh County in southwestern Indiana... Warrick County in southwestern Indiana... Daviess County in northwestern Kentucky... Henderson County in northwestern Kentucky... Union County in northwestern Kentucky...
    DURATION
    Until 815 AM CST.
  • Flood Watch for Epworth - Click for Details
    Expires: February 28, 2021 @ 12:00pm
    PRECAUTIONARY
    A Flood Watch means there is a potential for flooding based on current forecasts. You should monitor later forecasts and be alert for possible Flood Warnings. If you live in an area prone to flooding, be prepared to take action should flooding develop. Do not enter or cross flowing water or water of unknown depth, and remember, flood waters are harder to see at night. Never cross a barricaded road.
    LOCATION
    Portions of southern Illinois...southwest Indiana and southeast Missouri, including the following areas, in southern Illinois, Alexander, Franklin, Hamilton, Jackson, Johnson, Pulaski, Saline, Union, White and Williamson. In southwest Indiana, Gibson and Pike. In southeast Missouri, Bollinger, Butler, Cape Girardeau, Carter, Perry MO, Ripley, Scott, Stoddard and Wayne MO.
    DURATION
    Until Noon CST today
    INFO1
    A consistent signal for locally heavy rain is forecast, especially tonight. Storm total average rainfall is forecast to range from one to two inches in the Watch area and, with thunderstorms forecast, localized higher totals are possible. This amount of cumulative rainfall will be falling on recently soaked grounds from melted snowfall, so the ability to soak in all this expected rainfall will be compromised and likely to cause flood issues.
Current Weather

Illinois Department on Aging tips for winter weather preparedness

To combat the dangers of extreme winter weather, the Illinois Department on Aging (IDoA) has compiled a list of tips and signs to look out for to avoid serious safety and health complications. The environmental conditions during winter in Illinois pose a health risk to all residents, especially those in the older adult community. Older residents who do not have full mobility or live in isolation should have a plan of action in emergency weather conditions, such as snow storms and extremely cold temperatures. Those living in isolation should also have a contact to check in with during extreme winter weather situations.

IDoA has identified some health problems that can be brought on by severe winter weather:

INFLUENZA

  • The “flu” is a contagious respiratory infection. Symptoms include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny nose and soreness and aching in the back, arms and legs.
  • For older persons who have a chronic health problem, the flu can result in serious complications, such as pneumonia.
  • Flu shots are recommended for all persons aged 65 years and older and for those who suffer from chronic health problems, such as heart disease, respiratory problems, renal disease, diabetes, anemia or any disease that weakens the body’s immune system (consult your doctor before getting a flu shot on your own).

    HYPOTHERMIA

  • This is a condition brought on when the body temperature drops to 95 degrees or less.
  • Symptoms include slow or slurred speech, incoherence, memory loss, disorientation, uncontrollable shivering, drowsiness, repeated stumbling and apparent exhaustion.
  • It is recommended that older persons should not set their thermostats below 65 degrees during the winter months.
  • Even mild indoor temperatures of 60- 65 degrees can trigger hypothermia.

FROSTBITE

  • Exposed areas of the face (cheeks, nose, chin and forehead), ears, wrists, hands and feet are most affected by frostbite.
  • Symptoms are loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance to the skin.
  • To treat frostbite, warm the affected part of the body gradually. Wrap the frostbitten area in blankets, sweaters, coats, etc.
  • Caution: Do not rub the affected areas, serious damage to the tissue can occur.

     

    The State of Illinois offers warming centers for all individuals to escape harsh winter cold. Local warming centers can be found at: https://www.illinois.gov/KeepWarm/SitePages/WarmingCenters.aspx

Please visit the IDoA website for more information on winter storm safety preparedness at:https://www.illinois.gov/aging/Documents/winter_storm_preparedness_guidebook.pdf